SEBI HAS JURISDUCTION TO CONTROL GDRs – An Analysis

lawzmag.comThe Supreme Court in Securities and Exchange Board of India v. Pan Asia Advisors Ltd. explained that the jurisdiction of the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) covers the issuance of global depository receipts (GDRs) by Indian companies to its foreign investors, and also to ensnare lead managers to such issuances if they have an contrary impact on the Indian securities markets.

GDRs are instruments formed by a foreign depository outside India and authorised by a company making an issue of such depository receipts. A depository can be any company, bank, or institution that holds and facilitates the exchange of securities. Depositories issue receipts for the securities deposited with them, which then function as negotiable financial instruments that can be traded on a stock exchange.

Each GDR denotes a specific number of equity shares of an Indian company, which are listed on an Indian stock exchange. A local custodian in India holds the underlying equity shares on behalf of the depository. The depository issues these GDRs, which are then listed and traded on the foreign exchanges. The underlying equity shares are not traded on the Indian stock exchange until the GDR holder redeems the depository receipts. Until then, they are merely held by the local custodian.

In India, the Ministry of Company Affairs has issued the Companies (Issue of Global Depository Receipts) Rules, 2014 (“GDR Rules”) to govern the issue of GDRs. The GDR Rules provide that any GDR issue must comply with the GDR Rules and the Issue of Foreign Currency Convertible Bonds and Ordinary Shares (Through Depository Receipt Mechanism) Scheme, 1993, which was notified by the Ministry of Finance.

The Supreme Court looked at the powers of the SEBI under the Securities and Exchange Board of India Act, 1992 (“SEBI Act”) and the SEBI (Prohibition of Fraudulent and Unfair Trade Practice Relating to Securities Market) Regulations, 2003. After finding that the SEBI has extensive powers to protect the interests of investors in the securities markets, the Supreme Court noted that the alleged actions of the parties involved in the transactions adversely affected the Indian securities markets. It observed that “… the violation complained of by the appellant is with reference to such of those provisions contained in SEBI Act, 1992 vis-`-vis the underlying shares of GDRs. Therefore, we are unable to see any violation of exercise of its jurisdiction since the underlying shares of GDR were created and dealt with as well as traded in the stock market of Indian Territory.

It further relied on the case of GVK Industries Limited v. Income Tax Officer and stated that in order to proceed “in exercise of any extra territorial aspect, which has got a cause and something in India or related to India and Indians in terms of impact, effect or consequence would be a mixed matter of facts and of law, then the Courts have to enforce such a requirement in the operation of law as a matter of law itself.

So, with regard to the limited question of jurisdiction, the Supreme Court concluded that the SEBI has jurisdiction over GDR issues that impact the Indian securities markets. It sent the matter back to SAT for a decision on the merits of the case.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *